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OKC Police Officer, Terrance Yeakey  

IT'S DANGEROUS TO KNOW TOO MUCH

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As In The Whitewater Affair, Oklahoma City Bombing Witnesses Are Dying Fast.

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By Mike Blair (Spotlight, 5/19/97)

Two key witnesses in the Oklahoma City bombing case will not appear to testify at the Denver trial of Timothy McVeigh, one of the two accused of being responsible for the bombing, because they are dead.

One death has been labeled a suicide. The other victim was killed in an air crash. Both deaths took place under questionable circumstances.

The supposed suicide is Oklahoma City Police Officer Terrance Yeakey.  Also Dr. Howard D. Chumley was killed when his airplane crashed on a flight from Amarillo, Texas to Guthrie, Oklahoma.

Yeakey is one of those cited for extraordinary bravery right after the bombing of the Alfred E. Murrah Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City in his case for rescuing four people from the devastated structure before he fell through a floor and injured his back.

Official reports claim Yeakey slashed his wrists, one twice and the other three times, placed two slits in a vein at the bend of the elbow of one arm and four at the bend of the elbow of the other, and then stabbed himself with the knife in both sides of the throat, near the jugular vein. Then he walked one-and-a-half miles where he shot himself in the side of the head. The bullet entered the upper temple on the right side and exited below the upper jaw bone on the left side, meaning the gun would have been pointed in a downward angle -- a most unlikely way for a person bent on suicide to hold a gun.

Hard To Believe

"The burning question here is why he didn't just shoot himself in the first place, if suicide was his aim," one investigator remarked.

Police in Oklahoma claim that Yeakey had become depressed because of guilt that he was unable to save more people. He was scheduled to receive the Oklahoma City Police Department's Medal of Valor.

Yeakey, police claim, left no suicide note. However, The Spotlight has obtained a copy of a letter he sent to a victim of the bombing who was questioning the federal government's claims about the cause of the tragedy and those accused as the perpetrators.

Highlights from his letter follow:

The man that you and I were talking about in the pictures I have made the mistake of asking too many questions as to his role in the bombing and was told to back off...

I was told by several officers he was a ATF agent who was overseeing the bombing plot and at the time the photos were taken he was calling in his report of what had just went down!

Knowing what I know now and understanding fully just what went down that morning makes me ashamed to wear a badge from Oklahoma City's Police Department. I took an oath to uphold the law and to enforce the law to the best of my ability. This is something I cannot honestly do and hold my head up proud any longer if I keep my silence as I am ordered to do...

The sad truth of the matter is that they have so many police officers convinced that by covering up the truth about the operation gone wrong, that they are actually doing our citizens a favor. What I want to know is how many other operations have they had that blew up in their faces? Makes you stop and take another look at Waco...

Even if I tried to explain it to you the way it was explained to me and the ridiculous reason for having our own police department falsify reports to their fellow officers, to the citizens of the city and to our country, you would feel the way I do about all of this...

According to his death certificate, Yeakey's body was found in a field about two-and-a-half miles west of the El Reno (Oklahoma) Reformatory.

"About two weeks before his death, he'd come into my home at strange times -- 2:30 in the morning, 4 in the morning, unannounced, trying to give me life insurance policies," Yeakey's ex-wife stated. "He kept telling me we needed to get remarried immediately, or me and the girls would not be taken care of... I mean, why would a guy tell you to take a life insurance policy, knowing damn well it wouldn't pay for a suicide? He obviously knew he was in danger..."

Two key pages are missing from the letter, which was apparently written on a computer. Independent investigators have verified the letter to be authentic, according to retired FBI Senior Special Agent Ted L. Gunderson.

According to reports, described to The Spotlight by Gunderson, Chumley was approached shortly after the bombing and asked to falsify reports concerning injuries that BATF agents suffered when the building was bombed.

The physician flatly refused to make any reports of injuries that didn't occur. When he learned that another doctor in the Oklahoma City area had agreed to make the false reports, he objected and threatened to turn the physician in to medical authorities.

Chumley was killed on September 24, 1995 while the plane he was piloting from Amarillo to Guthrie was in a climb and suddenly plunged into a field. He was killed instantly.